Monday, November 24, 2014

Aaaaw....How Nice!

 I received the One Lovely Blog Award! 

Here are the rules for accepting this award: 

• Thank the person who nominated you for the award. 

Thank you, Donna Shepherd, for blessing me today. 

• Add the One Lovely Blog logo to your post. 

 • Share 7 things about yourself.
 • Nominate up to 15 bloggers you admire and inform the nominees by commenting on their blog. 

7 things people might not know about me: 

1. I don't believe in broccoli on pizza. It's just wrong.
2. I took dancing lessons as a kid.
3, But they haven't helped with Zumba at all!
4. I taught myself to read music.
5. I can sing the alphabet backwards.
6. My best yoga position is savasana (corpse pose).
7. I love Indian food!

Now to nominate SOME of the other bloggers deserving of this award. Check out these lovely blogs: 

Congratulations, fellow bloggers! Now pass it on!

Friday, November 7, 2014

Using Readers Theatre with Small Groups

Do you hesitate to use plays with your students because you’re dealing with such a small group? Whether you’re a special education teacher, homeschooler, religious educator, or involved parent, readers theatre can work for you and your kids! Here are some suggestions to help you modify theatre activities for your situation:

1. Cut! Mark out minor characters’ lines and eliminate nonessential scenes.

2. Take turns. Just round robin read instead of assigning parts. Everybody gets to read about the same amount and try out different roles.

3. There are no small parts…. Assign the big roles to the kids, then do all the small roles yourself. Or let one kid do all the small roles. (This is great for practicing different voices.)

4. Make do with two. If you only have two students – or just yourself and one student – then divide and conquer. Have one person do all the male roles while another does all the female roles. Or assign one large role and a few small roles to each actor. Or split up the adults’ and children’s roles. (It’s fun and funny for you to play the kids!)

5. Take a chance. Have everyone randomly draw characters’ names until all parts are assigned.

6. Put the narrator on a “soundtrack.” Record someone – yourself, a student, or a special “guest star” – reading the narrator’s part ahead of time. Then play the tape between the “live” reading of other parts.

For other theatre suggestions, go to my website and click on the theatre tab.